Menu
Science Library Category:

vaccine

Vaccination with bovine, chick, yeast antigens synthesizes cross-reactive antibodies targeting human acetylcholine receptor and MuSK protein to cause Myasthenia Gravis: Confirmed by natural experiment (VAERS data), bioinformatics, case reports, animal experiments and titer study
Published: 2019
SYNOPSIS

Animal protein containing vaccines cause autoimmune diseases even when
the vaccine does not contain an adjuvant. Adjuvanted vaccines only make the problem worse.
Vaccines interact to cause autoimmune diseases.

CITATION

Arumugham, Vinu. Zenodo, 2019, September 16 http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3421559.

SUMMARY

Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular junction disorder, development of which is often reported following the administration of many vaccines. Most cases occur following administration of the influenza vaccines (per the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System-VAERS), most of which are manufactured using embryonated chicken eggs and contain residual egg proteins (AchR proteins). The chick proteins are very similar to the AchR proteins in human beings, so when the antibody production is directed against the chick protein there is a cross reaction with the human AchR, causing MG.

A similar mechanism is involved in Graves’ disease (GD). Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is used to produce recombinant Hepatitis B vaccine (HBV), Human Papillomavirus vaccine (HPV) and injectable insulin products. We show significant protein sequence homology between GD autoepitopes, animal proteins and S. cerevisiae proteins. Humoral immune response directed against S. cerevisiae occurs following HBV, HPV administration and prolonged injectable insulin usage as in type 1 diabetes. Thus leading to the development of GD and numerous other autoimmune disorders.

The findings described add to the evidence that non-target antigens (NTA) in vaccines cause numerous disorders.

View Abstract

Advanced Clinical Decision Support for Vaccine Adverse Event Detection and Reporting
Published: 2015
SYNOPSIS

The odds of a VAERS report submission during the implementation period were 30.2 times greater than the odds during the comparable preimplementation period when an open-source, electronic health record–based clinical decision support system is used.

CITATION
SUMMARY

Reporting of adverse events (AEs) following vaccination can help identify rare or unexpected complications of immunizations and aid in characterizing potential vaccine safety signals. We developed an open-source, generalizable clinical decision support system called Electronic Support for Public Health–Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (ESP-VAERS) to assist clinicians with AE detection and reporting.

In the 8 months following implementation, 91 622 vaccinations were given. ESP-VAERS sent 1385 messages to responsible clinicians describing potential AEs. Clinicians opened 1304 (94.2%) messages, responded to 209 (15.1%), and confirmed 16 for transmission to VAERS. An additional 16 high-probability AEs were sent automatically. Reported events included seizure, pleural effusion, and lymphocytopenia. The odds of a VAERS report submission during the implementation period were 30.2 (95% confidence interval, 9.52–95.5) times greater than the odds during the comparable preimplementation period.

View Abstract