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Seizures

An investigation of infant deaths following initial hepatitis B vaccination based on the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), 1992-2002
Published: 2007
SYNOPSIS

Neonatal deaths following hepatitis B vaccination should be investigated as possible vaccine-related deaths.

CITATION

Soldatenkova VA, Yazbak FE. Medical Veritas. 2007;4:1414-1421.

SUMMARY

This study argues that all unexpected neonatal deaths occurring after initial hepatitis B vaccination should be systematically investigated. Over one-fifth (22%) of neonatal hepatitis B vaccine injuries reported to the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) from 1992 to 2002 were deaths (38/170) that, in nearly all cases, occurred within hours or days of vaccination. Although most of the deaths were officially classified as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or “unexplained” rather than as vaccine-related deaths, the authors note “a statistically significant increase in [the] proportion of neonatal SIDS since implementation of universal vaccination of newborns against hepatitis B.” The VAERS reports also are suggestive of higher risks for premature, small, or slightly ill infants.

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Experimental Epilepsy in the Monkey Following Multiple Intracerebral Injections of Alumina Cream
Published: 1953
SYNOPSIS

Aluminum caused tics and grand mal seizures in monkeys.

CITATION

Joseph G. Chusid, Lenore M. Kopeloff, Ph.D. and Nicholas Kopeloff, Ph.D. The Bulletin, 1953.

SUMMARY

The multiple intracerebral injection of alumina cream (aluminum hydroxide cream) into a principal cerebral sensorimotor cortical area is effective in producing chronic epilepsy in monkeys. In all injected animals a variable degree of contralateral hemiparesis was obvious immediately after operation. In five of the six monkeys injected unilaterally, spontaneous contralateral focal motor seizures were evident three to four weeks after operation. Initially there occurred almost continuous twitch-like movements of varying amplitude and regularity, involving the musculature of the contralateral face and limbs. Excitement, agitation, movement or stress readily aggravated and accentuated this type of motor activity and sometimes led to Jacksonian spread with full-blown generalized convulsive seizure and exhaustion.

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