Science Library Category:

Pertussis

Published: 2014
SYNOPSIS

These data provide a plausible explanation for pertussis resurgence and suggest that attaining herd immunity will require the development of improved vaccination strategies that prevent B. pertussis colonization and transmission.

TITLE

Acellular pertussis vaccines protect against disease but fail to prevent infection and transmission in a nonhuman primate model

CITATION

Jason M. Warfel, Lindsey I. Zimmerman, and Tod J. Merkel; Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences; January 14, 2014, 111 (2), 787-792; https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1314688110.

SUMMARY

In this study, researchers found that current acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines fail to prevent colonization and transmission. Nonhuman primates vaccinated with current acellular Pertussis (aP) were protected from severe symptoms but not infection and readily transmitted Bordetella pertussis to contacts.

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Published: 2012
SYNOPSIS

Danish researchers found children 8-times more likely to have a febrile seizure on the day of vaccination of DTaP-IPV-HiB vaccine.

TITLE

Risk of Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy After Vaccination With Diphtheria, Tetanus, Acellular Pertussis, Inactivated Poliovirus, and Haemophilus Influenzae Type b

CITATION

Yuelian Sun, Jakob Christensen, Anders Hviid, Jiong Li, Et al. Journal of the Amercian Medical Association, February 22/29, 2012—Vol 307, No. 8.

SUMMARY

“DTaP-IPV-Hib vaccination was associated with an increased risk of febrile seizures on the day of the first 2 vaccinations given at 3 and 5 months.”

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Published: 2010
SYNOPSIS

Acellular Pertussis vaccination interferes with the optimal clearance of B. parapertussis and enhances the performance of this pathogen. Our data raise the possibility that widespread acellular Pertussis vaccination can create hosts more susceptible to B. parapertussis infection.

TITLE

Acellular pertussis vaccination facilitates Bordetella parapertussis infection in a rodent model of bordetellosis

CITATION

Gráinne H. Long, Alexia T. Karanikas, Eric T. Harvill, Andrew F. Read and Peter J. Hudson, Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Biological Sciences; 03 March, 2010; Volume 277; https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2010.0010

SUMMARY

Despite over 50 years of population-wide vaccination, whooping cough incidence is on the rise. Although Bordetella pertussis is considered the main causative agent of whooping cough in humans, Bordetella parapertussis infections are not uncommon. The widely used acellular whooping cough vaccines (aP) are comprised solely of B. pertussis antigens that hold little or no efficacy against B. parapertussis. Here, we ask how aP vaccination affects competitive interactions between Bordetella species within co-infected rodent hosts and thus the aP-driven strength and direction of in-host selection. We show that aP vaccination helped clear B. pertussis but resulted in an approximately 40-fold increase in B. parapertussis lung colony-forming units (CFUs). Such vaccine-mediated facilitation of B. parapertussis did not arise as a result of competitive release; B. parapertussis CFUs were higher in aP-relative to sham-vaccinated hosts regardless of whether infections were single or mixed. Further, we show that aP vaccination impedes host immunity against B. parapertussis—measured as reduced lung inflammatory and neutrophil responses. Thus, we conclude that aP vaccination interferes with the optimal clearance of B. parapertussis and enhances the performance of this pathogen. Our data raise the possibility that widespread aP vaccination can create hosts more susceptible to B. parapertussis infection.

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